Close Sign Up Share Page Print Take Poll Provide Feedback
Close

Sign Up

Share Page

Print
 
Quiénes somos  |   Tungkol sa Amin  |   회사 소개  |   Về chúng tôi  |   关于我们

Maryland

Maryland State Victim Resources:

Attorney General Identity Theft Unit410-576-6491 or idtheft@oag.state.md.us
Identity Theft Passport Program
Free Maryland Identity Theft Legal Self Help Forms Online

Agencies that offer assistance to identity theft victims:

Security Freeze Law:

All Maryland consumers are allowed to place security freezes on their consumer credit reports to prevent new accounts from being opened in their names. Such a freeze enables the consumer to prevent anyone from looking at his/her credit file for the purpose of granting credit unless the consumer chooses to allow a particular business look at the information. To request a freeze, a consumer must request one in writing by certified mail. Starting January 1, 2010, consumers will be able to request a freeze by e-mail, telephone, or through a secure Internet connection. Consumer reporting agencies may charge a fee of $5 to place or temporarily lift a security freeze. However, victims of identity theft with a report of alleged identity theft fraud or an identity theft passport may not be charged. The reporting agency must place the freeze within three business days after receiving the request, and within five days after placing the freeze, must send a written confirmation of the freeze and provide the consumer with a unique personal identification number or password to be used by the consumer when providing authorization for the release of his credit for a specific party or period of time. Requests for a temporary unlocking of the freeze must be completed within three business days.
Statute: Commercial Law: §14-1212.1

Placing a security freeze for a “Protected consumer”: A protected consumer who is under the age of 16 years or an incapacitated person or a protected person for whom a guardian or conservator has been appointed in accordance with Title 13 of the Estates and Trusts Article. Individuals must show “sufficient proof of authority” showing a representative has authority to act on behalf of a protected consumer. This includes: An order issued by a court of law; a lawfully executed and valid power of attorney; and a written, notarized statement signed by a representative that expressly describes the authority of the representative to act on behalf of a protected consumer. An individual must also show “sufficient proof of identification” includes: A Social Security number or a copy of a Social Security card issued by the Social Security Administration; a certified or official copy of a birth certificate issued by the entity authorized to issue the birth certificate; a copy of a driver’s license, an identification card issued by the Motor Vehicle Administration, or any other government-issued identification; or a copy of a bill, including a bill for telephone, sewer, septic tank, water, electric, oil, or natural gas services, that shows a name and home address.

A consumer reporting agency shall place a security freeze for a protected consumer after receiving a request from the protected consumer’s representative; and provides to the consumer reporting agency sufficient proof of identification of the protected consumer and the representative provides to the consumer reporting agency sufficient proof of authority to act on behalf of the protected consumer.

If a consumer reporting agency does not have a file pertaining to a protected consumer when the consumer reporting agency receives a request, the consumer reporting agency shall create a record for the protected consumer. A security freeze for a protected consumer shall remain in effect until the protected consumer or the protected consumer’s representative requests the consumer reporting agency to remove the security freeze in accordance with this section; or the security freeze is removed in accordance with this section.

A consumer reporting agency may charge a reasonable fee, not exceeding $ 5, for each placement or removal of a security freeze for a protected consumer. A consumer reporting agency may not charge any fee under this section if the protected consumer’s representative has obtained a report of alleged identity fraud against the protected consumer under § 8-304 of the Criminal Law Article or an identity theft passport under § 8-305 of the Criminal Law Article; and provides a copy of the report or passport to the consumer reporting agency.
Statute: Md. COMMERCIAL LAW Code Ann. § 14-1212.2

Placing a security freeze for a "Protected consumer" who is under the age of 16 years or an incapacitated person or a protected person for whom a guardian or conservator has been appointed in accordance with Title 13 of the Estates and Trusts Article. Individuals must show "sufficient proof of authority" showing a representative has authority to act on behalf of a protected consumer. This includes: An order issued by a court of law; a lawfully executed and valid power of attorney; and a written, notarized statement signed by a representative that expressly describes the authority of the representative to act on behalf of a protected consumer. An individual must also show "sufficient proof of identification" includes: A Social Security number or a copy of a Social Security card issued by the Social Security Administration; a certified or official copy of a birth certificate issued by the entity authorized to issue the birth certificate; a copy of a driver's license, an identification card issued by the Motor Vehicle Administration, or any other government-issued identification; or a copy of a bill, including a bill for telephone, sewer, septic tank, water, electric, oil, or natural gas services, that shows a name and home address. A consumer reporting agency shall place a security freeze for a protected consumer after receiving a request from the protected consumer's representative; and provides to the consumer reporting agency sufficient proof of identification of the protected consumer and the representative provides to the consumer reporting agency sufficient proof of authority to act on behalf of the protected consumer. If a consumer reporting agency does not have a file pertaining to a protected consumer when the consumer reporting agency receives a request, the consumer reporting agency shall create a record for the protected consumer. A security freeze for a protected consumer shall remain in effect until the protected consumer or the protected consumer's representative requests the consumer reporting agency to remove the security freeze in accordance with this section; or the security freeze is removed in accordance with this section. A consumer reporting agency may charge a reasonable fee, not exceeding $ 5, for each placement or removal of a security freeze for a protected consumer. A consumer reporting agency may not charge any fee under this section if the protected consumer's representative has obtained a report of alleged identity fraud against the protected consumer under § 8-304 of the Criminal Law Article or an identity theft passport under § 8-305 of the Criminal Law Article; and provides a copy of the report or passport to the consumer reporting agency.
Statute: Md. COMMERCIAL LAW Code Ann. § 14-1212.2

How to Place a Security Freeze in Maryland:

http://consumersunion.org/research/state_security_freeze_laws/#MD

Mandatory Police Report Law for Identity Theft Victims:

A person who knows or reasonably suspects that he is a victim of identity fraud may contact a local law enforcement agency that has jurisdiction over any part of the county in which the person lives or any part of the county in which the crime occurred. State law requires a local law enforcement agency, after being contacted by such a person, to promptly prepare and file a report of the alleged identity fraud and provide a copy of the report to the victim. The local law enforcement agency contacted by the victim may subsequently refer the matter to a law enforcement agency with proper jurisdiction. A report filed under this section is not required to be counted as an open case for purposes including compiling open case statistics.
Statute: Criminal Law: §8.304

Identity Theft Passport Law:

Victims may apply for an identity theft passport, which can be presented to law enforcement to help prevent arrest or detention for an offense committed by another person using the person’s personal identifying information. It may also be presented to a creditor to aid in the investigation of a fraudulent accounts or charges. A person who knows or reasonably suspects that he is a victim of identity theft who has filed a police report may apply for an identity theft passport through a law enforcement agency. The agency will submit the application and copy of the police report to the Office of the Attorney General for processing and issuance of the passport. A law enforcement agency or creditor that is presented with an identity theft passport has sole discretion to accept or reject the identity theft passport. In determining whether to accept or reject the identity theft passport, the law enforcement agency or creditor may consider the surrounding circumstances and available information regarding the offense of identity fraud against the person.
Statute: Criminal Law: §8-305

Identity Theft Laws:

A person may not knowingly, willfully, and with fraudulent intent possess, obtain, or help another to possess or obtain any personal identifying information of an individual, without the consent of the individual, in order to use, sell, or transfer the information to get a benefit, health care or insurance, credit, good, service, or other thing of value in the name of the individual.

In addition, a person may not knowingly and willfully assume the identity of another to avoid identification, apprehension, or prosecution for a crime; with fraudulent intent to get a benefit, credit, good, service, or other thing of value; or avoid the payment of debt or other legal obligation.

“Personal identifying information” means a name, address, telephone number, driver’s license number, Social Security number, place of employment, employee identification number, mother’s maiden name, bank or other financial institution account number, date of birth, personal identification number, credit card number, or other payment device number. A “payment device number” means a code, account number, or other means of account access, other than a check, draft, or similar paper instrument, that can be used to obtain money, goods, services, or anything of value, or for purposes of initiating a transfer of funds.

Violations are a felony, punishable by up to fifteen years in prison and/or a fine up to $25,000, if the benefit, credit, good, service, or other thing that is the subject of the crime is valued at $500 or more. If the value is less than $500, it is a misdemeanor, punishable by up to eighteen months in prison and/or a fine up to $5,000. If a violation is committed pursuant to a scheme or continuing course of conduct, whether from the same or several sources, the conduct may be considered one offense. The value of goods or services may be aggregated to determine whether the violation is a felony or misdemeanor. If a person assumes the identity of another to avoid identification, apprehension, or prosecution for a crime, it is a misdemeanor, punishable by up to the eighteen months in prison and/or a fine up to $5,000. A person may not knowingly and willfully claim to represent another person without the knowledge and consent of that person, with the intent to solicit, request, or take any other action to otherwise induce another person to provide personal identifying information or a payment device number. Violations are a misdemeanor, punishable by up to the eighteen months in prison and/or a fine up to $5,000. If circumstances reasonably indicate that a person’s intent was to manufacture, distribute, or dispense another individual’s personal identifying information without the individual’s consent, it is a felony, punishable by up to five years in prison and/or a fine up to $25,000.
Statute: Criminal Law: §8.301

Jurisdiction:

State law allows the prosecution of identity theft, or any crime arising out of identity theft, to take place in any county in which an element of the crime occurred or where the victim resides. Law enforcement officers may operate without regard to jurisdictional boundaries to investigate identity fraud provisions, within specified limitations. The authority may be exercised only if an act related to the crime was committed in the jurisdiction of an investigative agency or a complaining witness resides in an investigating agency’s jurisdiction. Notification of an investigation must be made to appropriate law enforcement personnel. However, once an investigation is complete, detectives in one county must contact other jurisdictions in which crimes have occurred involving the same victim and request that they file charges in those jurisdictions.
Statute: Criminal Law: §8.301

Other Related Laws:

Restitution:

A person convicted of identity fraud may be ordered to make restitution to the victim for reasonable costs, including reasonable attorney’s fees; or costs incurred in clearing the victim’s credit history or credit rating, , for clearing the victim’s record or history related to health information or health care, or in connection with a civil or administrative proceeding to satisfy a debt, lien, judgment, or other obligation of the victim that arose because of the violation.
Statute: Criminal Law: §8.301: http://mgaleg.maryland.gov/webmga/frmStatutesText.aspx?article=gcr&section=8-301&ext=html&session=2015RS&tab=subject5

Security Breach:

Commercial entities: State law requires a business that owns or licenses computerized data that includes the personal information of a Maryland resident to conduct a reasonable and prompt investigation of any breach of security to determine the likelihood that personal information has been or will be misused as a result of the branch. If, after the investigation is concluded, the business determines that misuse of an individual’s personal information has occurred or is reasonably likely to occur as a result of the breach of security, the business must notify the individual of the breach. A security breach occurs upon “unauthorized acquisition of computerized data that compromises the security, confidentiality, or integrity of the personal information maintained by the business.”

Personal information is defined as an individual’s first name or first initial and last name in combination with any one or more of the following data elements, when the name or the data elements are not encrypted, redacted, or otherwise protected by another method that renders the information unreadable or unusable: Social Security number; driver’s license number; a financial account number, including a credit or debit card number, that in combination with any required security code, access code, or password, would permit access to an individual’s financial account; or a taxpayer identification number. It does not include publicly available information that is lawfully made available to the public from federal, state, or local government records.

Notice must be made as soon as reasonably practicable after the business conducts the investigation, but may be delayed upon the request of law enforcement or to determine the scope of the breach, identify the individuals affected, or to restore the reasonable integrity of the data system. Notification can be provided by mail, e-mail, or by telephone. If the cost of providing regular notice would exceed $100,000, the amount of people to be notified exceeds 175,000, or the business or agency does not have sufficient contact information to provide written or electronic notice, substitute notice may be provided. When substitute notice is used, it must consist of all of the following, as applicable: e-mail notice, conspicuous posting on the business’s web site, and notification to statewide media. If the number of affected consumers is 1,000 or more, the consumer reporting agencies must also be notified. In addition, the business must inform the Office of the Attorney General before notifying consumers.

The notification must include, to the extent possible, a description of the categories of information that were or are reasonably believed to have been acquired by an unauthorized person; contact information for the business making the notification, the major consumer reporting agencies, and the Federal Trade Commission and the Office of the Attorney General; and a statement that the individual can obtain information from these sources about steps the individual can take to avoid identity theft.
Statute: Commercial Law: §14-3501 through 3508 (Must forward through the relevant sections)

Governmental entities: Effective July 1, 2014, State and local governmental agencies will also be required to report security breaches.  http://mgaleg.maryland.gov/2013RS/chapters_noln/Ch_304_sb0676T.pdf

False Identification:

It is a misdemeanor punishable by to up two years in prison and/or a fine of $2000 to sell, issue, offer for sale, or offer to issue an identification card or document that contains a blank space for a person’s age or date or birth, a person’s incorrect age or date of birth, an incorrect name, or incorrect address. Each card or document sold or issued is a crime that may be separately prosecuted.
Statute: Criminal Law: §8-302

A person may not, with fraudulent intent: possess a fictitious or fraudulently altered government identification document; display, cause, or allow to be displayed a fictitious or fraudulently altered government identification document; lend a government identification document to another or knowingly allow the use of the person’s government identification document by another; or display or represent as the person’s own a government identification document not issued to the person. Violations are a misdemeanor, punishable by up to six months in prison and/or a fine up to $500.
Statute: Criminal Law: §8-303

Payment Cards:

A person may not make or cause to be made, directly or indirectly, a false statement in writing about the identity of the person or of another to procure the issuance of a credit card, knowing the statement to be false and with the intent that the statement be relied on. Violations are a misdemeanor, punishable by up to eighteen months in prison and/or a fine up to $500.
Statute: Criminal Law: §8–203

A person is guilty of credit card theft if he:

  • Takes a credit card from another, or from the possession, custody, or control of another without the consent of the cardholder; or with knowledge that a credit card has been so taken, receives the credit card with the intent to use it or sell or transfer it to another who is not the issuer or the cardholder.
  • Receives a credit card that the person knows was lost, mislaid, or delivered under a mistake as to the identity or address of the cardholder and retains possession of the credit card with the intent to use, sell, or transfer it to another who is not the issuer or the cardholder.
  • Sells a credit card unless the person is the issuer; or buys a credit card from a person other than the issuer.
  • Receives a credit card that the person knows was taken or retained fraudulently.

Violations are a misdemeanor, punishable by up to 18 months in prison and/or a fine up to $500.
Statute: Criminal Law: §8-204

A person may not for the purpose of obtaining money, goods, services, or anything of value, and with the intent to defraud another, use a credit card obtained or retained illegally or a credit card that the person knows is counterfeit. In addition, a person may not, with the intent to defraud another, obtain money, goods, services, or anything of value by representing without the consent of the cardholder, that the person is the holder of a specified credit card; or that the person is the holder of a credit card when the credit card had not been issued.
Statute: Criminal Law: §8-206

It is also unlawful to receive money, goods, services, or anything of value if the person knows or believes that the money, goods, services, or other thing of value was obtained illegally.
Statute: Criminal Law: §8-209

If the value of all money, goods, services, and other things of value obtained exceeds $500, it is a felony, punishable by up to fifteen years in prison and/or a fine up to $10,000. If the value is between $100 and $500, it is a misdemeanor, punishable by up to eighteen months in prison and/or a fine up to $500. If the value is below $100, it is a misdemeanor, punishable by up to 90 days in jail and/or a fine up to $500.

If a person violates any of these provisions as part of one scheme or a continuing course of conduct, from the same or several sources, the conduct may be considered as one violation; and the value of money, goods, services, or things of value may be aggregated in determining if the crime is a felony or a misdemeanor.
Statute: Criminal Law: §8-202

Destruction of Records:

State law requires a business, when destroying a customer’s records that contain personal information, to take reasonable steps to protect against unauthorized access to or use of the personal information, taking into account the sensitivity of the records, the nature and size of the business and its operation, the costs and benefits of different destruction methods, and available technology.
Statute: Commercial Law: §14-3501 through 3508 (Must forward through the relevant sections)

Scanning Devices:

State law prohibits the possession or use of a skimming device or re-encoder that is used to obtain or record encoded information from the magnetic strip of a payment card to knowingly, willingly, and with fraudulent intent to obtain a benefit, credit, good, service, or other thing of value. Skimming devices are defined as a scanner, reader, or any other electronic device that is used to access, read, scan, obtain, memorize, or store, temporarily or permanently, information encoded on the magnetic strip or stripe of a payment card without the consent of the individual authorized to use the card. A re-encoder is an electronic device that places encoded information from the magnetic strip or stripe of a payment card onto the magnetic strip or stripe of a different card. If the benefit, good, credit, service, or other thing of value has a value of $500 or greater, violations are a felony and are punishable by up to 15 years in prison and/or a fine up to $25,000. If the value is under $500, it is a misdemeanor and punishable by up to 18 months in prison and/or a fine up to $5000.
Statute: Criminal Law: §8-301

Law Enforcement Training for Identity Theft and Uniform Identity Fraud Reporting Form:

Establishing standards of schools that conduct police entrance-level and in-service training courses required by the Commission, including State, regional, county, and municipal training schools. Requires entrance-level police training and at least every 3 years for in-service level police training conducted by the State and each county and municipal police training school and that the curriculum and minimum courses of study include special training, attention to the contact with and treatment of victims of crimes and delinquent acts; the notices, services, support, and rights available to victims and victims’ representatives under State law; and the notification of victims of identity fraud and related crimes of their rights under federal law. Also work to develop, with the cooperation of the Office of the Attorney General, the Governor’s Office of Crime Control and Prevention, and the Federal Trade Commission, a uniform identity fraud reporting form that makes transmitted data available on or before October 1, 2011, for use by each law enforcement agency of State and local government; and may authorize the data to be transmitted to the Consumer Sentinel program in the Federal Trade Commission.
Statute: Md. PUBLIC SAFETY Code Ann. § 3-207:  http://mgaleg.maryland.gov/webmga/frmStatutesText.aspx?article=gps&section=3-207&ext=html&session=2015RS&tab=subject5; http://www.mdle.net/regs/ptcECDregs.pdf

Information gathered from sources including Identity Theft Resource Center and Identity Crime in partnership with International Association of Chiefs of Police and Bank of America.