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Integrating Crime Victims' Issues Into College and University Curricula Feedback image

Overview

Whether we are faculty, employers, employees, students, family members, advocates, or friends, we will encounter crime victims in our everyday lives and knowing the appropriate response is critical. Integrating Crime Victims' Issues Into College and University Curricula was designed for use by faculty and university departments and programs to incorporate multidisciplinary educational approaches for integrating crime victim issues into their curricula. One of OVC's aims is to increase the role of educators and educational institutions in addressing the issues that crime victims face.

According to the National Crime Victimization Survey, in 2012 there were an estimated 5.8 million violent victimizations and 17.1 million property victimizations in the United States. Victims and those who are a part of their lives can experience physical, psychological, emotional, and financial consequences from these crimes.

Communities are also impacted by victimization. For students, experiences with their own close friends' or family members' victimization or residing in communities with high rates of crime can lead to a host of negative outcomes that may in turn negatively impact academic performance including class completion and achievement of class objectives and goals.

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About the Curricula

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The U.S. Department of Justice, Office for Victims of Crime (OVC), funded the University of Massachusetts Lowell, School of Criminology and Justice Studies, along with partners from the University of Massachusetts Boston, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, and University of Massachusetts Medical School to develop innovative, multidisciplinary education models that address victimization issues and responses to crime victims.

The project is designed to broaden college and university students' awareness of crime victims' issues and knowledge of appropriate responses, and to increase the number and diversity of students exposed to and educated in crime victims' issues. The approach is based on the premise that by adding a victim issues component to existing courses and programs, developing new victim-oriented courses and programs, and increasing the availability of victim-oriented field placements, victim issues will obtain a new level of prominence in university and college curricula.

The curricula material was developed using rigorous standards—material was developed by educators from the criminal justice and medical fields for educators; material was pilot tested with college students to ensure that it was effective; and the final material was peer reviewed by education leaders in criminal justice.

The materials that have been developed and tested are designed for:

Faculty. College and university faculty teach about these issues and, even when a course is not directly about a crime victim issue, victimization issues come up in class and can impact student work. These materials enable faculty from diverse disciplines to educate themselves more fully about crime victims' issues and about responding appropriately to victims. These materials can also assist with adding victim issues components to existing courses and programs, developing new victim-oriented courses and programs, and increasing the availability of victim-oriented field placements.

Victim advocates. Victim advocates, State Victim Assistance Academy members, and all professionals who work with victims may find the materials useful when they teach classes. They may also want to share them with faculty to promote appropriate and sensitive faculty responses to students who are crime victims, and to advocate to faculty that their colleges and universities adopt them for their coursework in order to better prepare students for future careers and for taking a role in society that is sensitive to crime victim issues.

The materials are designed to be easily customized for faculty and victim advocates needs.

Curriculum Kits/Teaching Materials: Course materials on a variety of topics, including reading lists, slides, class exercises, and sample assignments, and electronic and media presentations.

Faculty Involvement: Steps to take to create a supportive learning environment for students, handle disclosures, and provide appropriate support and referrals.

Promoting Student Involvement: Templates designed to be used for student placements that focus on victim issues.

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Curriculum Kits/Teaching Materials

Course materials on a variety of topics, including reading lists, slides, class exercises, and sample assignments, and electronic and media presentations.

Providing Care and Support for Victims of Crime
To provide college students with a foundation on how to be present for and provide resources to people in their lives who are victimized by crime, including those who share their campus environment.

  • Instructor's Guide [PDF 136KB]
  • PowerPoint [PPT 838KB | PDF 861KB]
  • Exercises and Assignments [PDF 381KB | MS Word 146KB]
  • CPR Card [PDF 84KB | MS Word 36KB]
  • Handout: National Resources [PDF 17KB | MS Word 62KB]

The Impact of Victimization
To provide college students with a basic overview of the impact of criminal victimization and the importance of understanding the essential elements of types of harm and the types of reactions victims may experience as well as how victim impact may vary for different types of offenses and also from one victim to the next.

  • Instructor's Guide [PDF 121KB]
  • PowerPoint [PPT 809KB | PDF 776KB]
  • Reading: The Impact of Criminal Victimization [PDF 64KB]
  • Handout: National Resources [PDF 17KB | MS Word 62KB]

Responding to Victims of Crime: Basics for Interns
To provide college students with an introduction to basic skills for interacting with victims of crime in an internship or field placement setting.

  • Instructor's Guide [PDF 179KB]
  • PowerPoint [PPT 856KB | PDF 832KB]
  • Assignments [PDF 79KB | MS Word 96KB]
  • Reading: Victim Impact Statement for Jane Mosher-Buyno [PDF 19KB]
  • Handout: National Resources [PDF 17KB | MS Word 62KB]

The Nature and Extent of Criminal Victimization
To provide college students with an overview of the nature and extent of criminal victimization.

  • Instructor's Guide [PDF 154KB]
  • PowerPoint [PPT 876KB | PDF 819KB]
  • Reading: The Nature and Extent of Criminal Victimization [PDF 148KB]
  • Handout: National Resources [PDF 17KB | MS Word 62KB]

Victims and the Police: A Victim's Journey Through the Criminal Justice System
To provide college students with an overview of the relationship between law enforcement and victims in the crime reporting process.

  • Instructor's Guide [PDF 106KB]
  • PowerPoint [PPT 896KB | PDF 816KB]
  • Reading: A Victim's Journey Through the Criminal Justice System: Reporting to and Interacting With the Police [PDF 118KB]
  • Handout: National Resources [PDF 17KB | MS Word 62KB]

Victims and the Public Prosecutor: A Victim's Journey Through the Criminal Court System
To provide college students with an overview of the official relationship between the public prosecutor and a victim and the victim's role in the processing of a case through the criminal court system.

  • Instructor's Guide [PDF 85KB]
  • PowerPoint [PPT 840KB | PDF 788KB]
  • Reading: Dealing With the Prosecutor and the Court System [PDF 82KB]
  • Handout: National Resources [PDF 17KB | MS Word 62KB]

Who is a Victim of Crime?
To provide college students with a description of who may be considered a victim of crime, primary and secondary victims, and the types of harm victims may experience.

  • Instructor's Guide [PDF 46KB]
  • PowerPoint [PPT 860KB | PDF 717KB]
  • Reading: Who is a Victim of Crime? [PDF 57KB]
  • Handout: National Resources [PDF 17KB | MS Word 62KB]

Victim Awareness: Reading, Analyzing, and Writing Victim Impact Statements
To teach college students in a creative way how crime impacts victims and how victims may respond.

  • Instructor's Guide [PDF 64KB]
  • Readings:
    1. Victim Impact Statement for Jane Mosher-Buyno [PDF 544KB]
    2. MADDvocate — "A Healing Impact" [PDF 1,980KB]
    3. MADDvocate — "I Knew Before I Was Told" [PDF 957KB]
    4. MADDvocate — "Shattering of the Soul" [PDF 735KB]
    5. MADDvocate — "Trial and Consequences" [PDF 946KB]
    6. Madoff Victim Impact Statements — Ronnie Sue & Dominic Ambrosino [PDF 53KB]
    7. Madoff Victim Impact Statements — Norma Hill [PDF 69KB]
    8. Madoff Victim Impact Statements — Carla Hirschhorn [PDF 73KB]
    9. Madoff Victim Impact Statements — Caren Low [PDF 39KB]
    10. The Penn Stater — "Remembering Michael" [PDF 170KB]
  • Handout: National Resources [PDF 17KB | MS Word 62KB]

Addressing the Needs of Crime Victims in Medical Practice
To provide medical students and residents with current, cutting-edge, practical knowledge and skill development regarding victim assistance to children who have been maltreated, sexually abused, physically abused, and/or have witnessed domestic or community violence.

  • Instructor's Guide [PDF 61KB]
  • PowerPoint Medical Students [PPT 843KB | PDF 760KB]
  • PowerPoint Residents [PPT 966KB | PDF 858KB]
  • Handouts 1-4 [PDF 135KB]
  • Handouts 5-9 and Resource Card Sample [PDF 620KB]
  • Handout: National Resources [PDF 17KB] | MS Word 62KB]

Faculty Involvement

Steps to take to create a supportive learning environment for students, handle disclosures, and provide appropriate support and referrals.

  • Faculty Involvement [PDF 33KB]
  • Teaching About Criminal Victimization: Guidelines for Faculty [PDF 147KB | MS Word 186KB]
  • Crime Trends (NCVRW)
  • Cost of Crime (2012 NCVRW) [PDF 117KB]
  • Mental Health Consequences of Crime (2011 NCVRW) [PDF 137KB]
  • Reading: The Nature and Extent of Criminal Victimization [PDF 148KB]
  • PowerPoint from the Sloan Consortium: Responding to the Challenges of Victimization Issues in an Online Environment (presented October 10, 2012) [PPT 191KB | PDF 110KB]

Additional Materials

Promoting Student Involvement

Templates designed to be used for student placements that focus on victim issues.

  • Introduction: Promoting Student Involvement in Crime Victim Issues [PDF 92KB]
  • Internships Overview [PDF 53KB]
  • Assumption College Sample Flier [PDF 703KB]
  • Cover Letter to Internship Supervisor [PDF 47KB | MS Word 101KB]
  • Intern Evaluation [PDF 27KB | MS Word 92KB]
  • Victim Services-Related Internship Agreement [PDF 58KB | MS Word 91KB]
  • Victim Services-Related Internship MOU [PDF 24KB | MS Word 88KB]
  • Criminal Justice Agency Internship Agreement [PDF 22KB | MS Word 68KB]
  • Criminal Justice Agency Internship MOU [PDF 23KB | MS Word 90KB]
  • Allied Professions Internship Agreement [PDF 48KB | MS Word 92KB]
  • Allied Professions Internship MOU [PDF 78KB | MS Word 88KB]

Acknowledgements

These materials were developed under a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice, Office for Victims of Crime (OVC). OVC funded the University of Massachusetts Lowell School of Criminology and Justice Studies, along with partners from the University of Massachusetts Boston, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, and University of Massachusetts Medical School. The purpose of this cooperative grant was to develop innovative, multidisciplinary education models that address victimization issues and responses to crime victims.

Linda Williams, Ph.D., UMass Lowell; David Hirschel, Ph.D., UMass Lowell; and Alison Cares, Ph.D., Assumption College and UMass Lowell served as the Principal Investigators. Mary Frederick, UMass Lowell, was the Project Manager.

Project partners include:

  • Andrea Leverentz, Ph.D., University of Massachusetts Boston
  • Susan Krumholz, Ph.D., J.D., University of Massachusetts Dartmouth
  • Ira Packer, Ph.D., University of Massachusetts Medical School

Grant subrecipients for curriculum development and testing include:

  • Linda Bass, Ph.D., Department of Marriage and Family Therapy, Friends University
  • Marcel Beausoleil, Ph.D., Criminal Justice Department, Fitchburg State University
  • Michael deArellano, Ph.D., National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center, Medical University of South Carolina
  • Jennifer Gibbs, Ph.D., Department of Criminal Justice, West Chester University
  • Janel Leone, Ph.D., Psychology Department, Siena College
  • Christina Lopez, Ph.D., Institute of Psychiatry, Medical University of South Carolina
  • Sheila Peters, Ph.D., Psychology Department, Fisk University
  • Dani Smith, Ph.D., Sociology Department, Fisk University
  • Janet Stamatel, Ph.D., Department of Sociology, University of Kentucky

Other key contributors include:

  • Eve Buzawa, Ph.D., School of Criminology and Justice Studies, UMass Lowell
  • Robert Eckstein, Psy.D., Department of Psychology and Justice Studies, University of New Hampshire
  • Bridget Marshall, Ph.D., Department of English, UMass Lowell
  • Alison Moll, M.Ed., UMass Boston
  • Melissa Schaefer Morabito, Ph.D., School of Criminology and Justice Studies, UMass Lowell
  • Kerry Seitz, M.A., Sunrise Career Coaching, Massachusetts

The material was tested and/or peer reviewed by many groups and individuals, including:

  • Kevin Becker, Psy.D., Massachusetts Victim Assistance Academy
  • Lisa Bostaph, Ph.D., Department of Criminal Justice, Boise State University
  • Julie Coon, Ph.D., Roger Williams University
  • Shahara Drew, Ph.D., Department of English, Assumption College
  • Mario Gaboury, Ph.D., J.D., Henry C. Lee College of Criminal Justice and Forensic Science, University of New Haven
  • Daniel Hamilton, Center for Hope and Healing, Lowell, Massachusetts
  • Roi Holt, Victim Assistance Program Coordinator, U.S. Department of the Interior
  • Jill Lohmeier, Ph.D., Graduate School of Education, UMass Lowell
  • Maureen Lowell, Ph.D., Department of Justice Studies, San Jose State University
  • Mai Lin Rogoff, M.D., University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Deb Stanley, Ph.D., University of Baltimore
  • Rhoda Trietsch, LMHC, LCSW, The Counseling Center, UMass Lowell
  • UMass Lowell Fine Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences First Year Experiences Seminar Faculty
  • UMass Lowell Department of English College Writing Faculty

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